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What’s Your NLE of Choice

February 3, 2014 by Steve Modica

Now that we’re several months removed from Apple’s introduction of Mavericks for OSX and we’ve all tested the waters a little, I wanted to talk about video editing software and how the various versions play with NAS storage like we use at Small Tree.

Avid has long since released Media Composer 7, and from what I’ve seen, their AMA support (support for non-Avid shared storage), continues to improve.  There are certainly complaints about the performance not matching native MXF workflows, but now that they’ve added read/write support, it’s clear they are moving in a more NAS friendly direction. With some of the confusion going on in the edit system space, we’re seeing more and more interested in MC 7.

Adobe has moved to their Creative Cloud model and I’ve noticed that it made it much easier to keep my system up to date.  All of my test systems are either up to date, or telling me they need and update, so I can be fairly certainly I’m working with the latest release. That’s really important when dealing with a product as large and integrated as the Adobe Suite of products. You certainly don’t want to mix and match product revisions when trying to move data between After Effects and Premiere.

Another thing I’ve really grown to like about Adobe is their willingness to work with third party vendors (like Small Tree) to help correct problems that impact all of our customers.  One great example is that Adobe worked around serious file size limitations present in Apple’s QuickTime libraries. Basically, any time an application would attempt to generate a large QuickTime file (larger than 2GB), there was a chance the file would stop encoding at the 2GB mark.  Adobe dived into the problem, understood it, and worked around it in their applications.  This makes them one of the first to avoid this problem and certainly the most NAS friendly of all the video editing applications out there.

Lastly, I’ve seen some great things come out of FCP X in recent days.  One workflow I’m very excited about involves using “Add SAN Location” (the built in support for SAN Volumes) and NFS (Network File Sharing).  It turns out, if you mount your storage as NFS and create “Final Cut Projects” and “Final Cut Events” within project directories inside that volume, FCP X will let you “add” them as SAN locations. This lets you use very inexpensive NAS storage in lieu of a much more expensive Fibre Channel solution.  For shops that find FCP X fits their workflow, they’ll find that NFS NAS systems definitely fit their pocket books.

So as you move forward with your Mac platforms into Mavericks and beyond, consider taking a second look at your NLE (Non-Linear Editor) of choice. You may find that other workflow options are opening up.

 


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