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  1. What you need to know about video editing storage in 2014

    January 20, 2014 by Steve Modica

    With the New Year festivities well behind us, today seems like as good a time as any to chat about where video editing storage is (or should be) headed in 2014.

    First, I’m really excited about FCoE.  FCoE is great technology. It’s built into our (Small Tree) cards, so we get super fast offloads. It uses the Fibre Channel protocol, so it’s compatible with legacy Fibre Channel.  You can buy one set of switches and do everything: Fibre Channel, 10Gb and FCoE (and even iSCSI if you want).

    Are there any issues to be concerned about with FCoE? One problem is that the switches are too darn expensive! I’ve been waiting for someone to release an inexpensive switch and it just hasn’t happened.  Without that, I’m afraid the protocol will take a long time to come to market.

    Second, I’m quite sure SSDs are the way of the future. I’m also quite sure SSDs will be cheaper and easier to fabricate than complex spinning disks. So why aren’t SSDs ubiquitous yet? Where are the 2 and 4 TB SSD drives that fit a 3.5″ form factor?  Why aren’t we rapidly replacing our spinning disks with SSDs as they fail?

    Unfortunately, we’re constrained by the number of factories that can crank out the NAND flash chips. Even worse, there are so many things that need them, including smartphones, desktop devices, SATA disks, SAS disks, PCIE disks.  With all of these things clawing at the market for chips, it’s no wonder they are a little hard to come by.  I’m not sure things will settle down until things “settle down” (i.e., a certain form factor becomes dominant).

    Looking back at 2013, there were several key improvements that will have a positive impact on shared storage in 2014. One is Thunderbolt. Small Tree spent a lot of time updating its drivers to match the new spec. Once this work was done, we had some wonderful new features. Our cards can now seamlessly hotplug and unplug from a system. So customers can walk in, plug in, connect up and go.  Similarly, when it’s time to go home, they unplug, drop their laptop in their backpack, and go home. I think this opens the door to allowing a lot more 10Gb Ethernet use among laptop and iMac users.

    Apple’s new SMB implementation in 2013 was also critical for improvements in video editing workflow. Apple’s moving away from AFP as their primary form of sharing storage between Macs, and the upshot for us has been a much better SMB experience for our customers. It’s faster and friendlier to heterogeneous environments. I look forward to seeing more customers moving to an open SMB environment from a more restrictive (and harder to performance tune) AFP environment.

    So as your editing team seeks to simplify its workflow to maximize its productivity in 2014, keep these new or improved technological enhancements in mind. If you have any questions about your shared storage solution, don’t hesitate to contact me at smodica@small-tree.com.